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We broad­cast music, news and dis­cus­sion from 10am to 10pm and repeat overnight, 7 days a week. We also Mix­cloud our shows so that you can listen whenever and wherever suits you.

We cover a wide range of top­ics by all ages for all ages:

  • Eco issues, human rights and in-depth news (both local and global)
  • Sci­ence, his­tory, arts and poetry
  • Stor­ies, week­end live per­form­ances by Brighton musicians.

For more inform­a­tion, please see the About Us page.

LISTEN HERE NOW! ZRB response to IPPC report

LISTEN HERE

RESEARCH PRESENTED IN LONDON AND ONLINE: 9th April 6:30pm

A leaked draft of the latest IPCC report from Work­ing Group III, being dis­cussed this week in Ber­lin, calls for rad­ical emis­sions reduc­tions glob­ally which will require “large-scale trans­form­a­tions in human soci­et­ies”. The IPCC report calls for a reduc­tion in emis­sions of 50% (from 2010 levels) by 2030 for developed nations such as the UK.

Tomor­row, in front of an audi­ence of three hun­dred in Lon­don and broad­cast to many more online, research­ers will present a rad­ical plan for redu­cing emis­sions faster than IPCC pro­jec­tions. Com­ment­ing on why we in the UK might need faster emis­sions reduc­tions than the IPCC top line fig­ure of 50% by 2030, Alice Hooker-Stroud, Zero Car­bon Bri­tain research coördin­ator said:

 “Any green­house gas we put into the atmo­sphere from now or risks people’s lives and hap­pi­ness as well as eco­sys­tems. It isn’t yet clear how likely these levels of emis­sions would be to increase tem­per­at­ures by more than two degrees, or how the IPCC have divided the respons­ib­il­ity for cut­ting emis­sions between rich and poorer nations. Both of these things are import­ant moral ques­tions relat­ing to cli­mate mit­ig­a­tion which the report will have to make a judge­ment on.

 “What is clear is that rad­ical action is neces­sary. Our judge­ment is that as a rich nation with a long his­tory of high emis­sions and there­fore par­tic­u­lar respons­ib­il­ity for the cli­mate prob­lem, we should be doing everything we pos­sibly can to limit cli­mate change impacts around the globe, remem­ber­ing that all future emis­sions carry a risk.

 “Addi­tional bene­fits to imple­ment­ing such meas­ures include cre­at­ing 1.5million jobs, improv­ing pop­u­la­tion health and increas­ing the UK’s energy and food self suf­fi­ciency, while help­ing us adapt to cli­mate impacts, such as flood­ing, that are already in the pipeline.”

 Zero Car­bon Bri­tain is a rig­or­ous energy scen­ario which demon­strates that achiev­ing net zero emis­sions in the UK by 2030 is tech­nic­ally pos­sible using only cur­rent tech­no­logy, while main­tain­ing a mod­ern stand­ard of living.”

 The in-depth research, which included mod­el­ling hourly energy pro­duc­tion and con­sump­tion data over a ten year period, shows that net zero emis­sions are pos­sible using a com­bin­a­tion of redu­cing energy demand, 100% renew­able sources of energy and care­ful man­age­ment of land.

 Carbon-negative tech­no­lo­gies

 The IPCC report shows that we are cur­rently fail­ing to imple­ment emis­sions reduc­tion fast enough. They warn that we are cur­rently on track to over­shoot the 2 degrees ‘guard­rail’ in global aver­age tem­per­at­ure increase, and would have to con­sider large-scale carbon-negative tech­no­lo­gies if emis­sions aren’t reduced quickly enough.

 Alice argues:

 “It is neither sens­ible or desir­able to rely on uncer­tain, large-scale, carbon-negative future tech­no­lo­gies : we already have everything we need to act respons­ibly, and play our part in the global effort to tackle cli­mate change. We shouldn’t be rely­ing on future tech­no­lo­gies that may or may not get us out of the prob­lem we all saw com­ing and knew was avoidable.

 “Over­shoot­ing the 2 degree ‘guard­rail’ would be dev­ast­at­ing. I wouldn’t call that a plan at all – it’s reck­less and irre­spons­ible. Smal­ler scale car­bon cap­ture by nat­ural eco­sys­tems could play a role in get­ting the UK to net zero emis­sions, but we have to respect that there are lim­its to these sys­tems. There are so many other options for pro­du­cing low car­bon energy and redu­cing con­sump­tion, and there are bene­fits from choos­ing to do so.”

 Mul­tiple bene­fits from emis­sions reduction

 Rap­idly redu­cing emis­sions can’t rely on any single tech­no­logy. It requires big cul­tural changes includ­ing poten­tial changes to diets, trans­port pat­terns and energy con­sump­tion. The Zero Car­bon Bri­tain scen­ario includes redu­cing the amount of meat and dairy in our diet to allow for more pro­vi­sion of food from UK sources, all bio­mass for energy to be grown sus­tain­ably in the UK, and expan­sion of nat­ural eco­sys­tems for car­bon capture.

 Yet most of these actions required to reduce emis­sions were high­lighted as hav­ing mul­tiple bene­fits in the IPCC Work­ing Group II sum­mary report released last week:

 “Examples of actions [to mit­ig­ate cli­mate change] with co-benefits include (i) improved energy effi­ciency and cleaner energy sources, lead­ing to reduced emis­sions of health-damaging climate-altering air pol­lut­ants; (ii) reduced energy and water con­sump­tion in urban areas through green­ing cit­ies and recyc­ling water; (iii) sus­tain­able agri­cul­ture and forestry; and (iv) pro­tec­tion of eco­sys­tems for car­bon stor­age and other eco­sys­tem services.”

 Alice con­cludes on the scale of the trans­form­a­tion necessary:

“Large changes will be neces­sary to act on cli­mate change, but the solu­tions are here. We can make these changes now, or have changes imposed upon us from a changed cli­mate for gen­er­a­tions to come: it’s our choice.”

 The Zero Car­bon Bri­tain pro­ject is the flag­ship research pro­ject from the Centre for Altern­at­ive Tech­no­logy. The pro­ject mod­els a tech­nic­ally robust scen­ario where the UK pro­duces net zero emis­sions by 2030, using only cur­rently avail­able tech­no­logy and whilst main­tain­ing a mod­ern stand­ard of living.

The latest report ‘Zero Car­bon Bri­tain: Rethink­ing the Future’ is the third report pub­lished by the pro­ject, and includes new detailed research on man­aging sup­ply and demand with 100% renew­able energy, and feed­ing the pop­u­la­tion on a healthy, low car­bon diet.

mailto:o.280.113038.66e6f04cafc6fb5f@mail.cat.org.uk

Media Depart­ment
Machynlleth, POW SY20 9AZ
United Kingdom
 

Listen here: Why STOP the March for England? Politics Show on StopMFE

LISTEN HERE 

The March for Eng­land are return­ing to Brighton on Sunday 27th April.

_ Who are they?
_ Why is this a prob­lem?
_ Why do we need to oppose them?
_ Is there another way?

 

The cur­rent situ­ation of war and eco­nomic hard­ship, com­bined with the anti-immigrant scare­mon­ger­ing of the press and the UKIP has cre­ated a cli­mate where extreme right-wing groups can flourish.

Dis­cus­sion with: Davy Jones Green Party Par­lia­ment­ary Can­did­ate for Kemp­town & sct­iv­ists from Stop MFE

Twit­ter: @stopmfe
Web: stopmfe.wordpress.com
Email: stopmfe@ymail.com

 

 

 

Listen here: Third Show Cypher Under The Station

 

LISTEN HERE to the third in the series

LISTEN HERE to the first of a new series of hip hop rap shows spon­tan­eously exud­ing from Adam Feld­man and his guests  - some of the most tal­en­ted Brighton artists. Catch up with future shows Thursday nights 8pm.

 

Listen here to Davy Jones Politics Show with Brighton’s Firefighters

LISTEN HERE TO DAVE JONES DISCUSS THE CUTS BEING MADE TO BRIGHTON FIRE SERVICE

LISTEN HERE TO DAVY JONES WITH KEITH TAYLOR MEP

LISTEN HERE TO DAVY JONES JO WILDING AND RIAD EL-TAHER ON 11th ANNIVERSARY OF IRAQ WAR

This week, on the elev­enth anniversary of the Iraq War, Davy Jones hosts a dis­cus­sion in which Jo Wild­ing talks about her exper­i­ences in Iraq just as the war was start­ing and there­after. Riad El-Taher talks about the war the reas­ons why it happened and the roles of some of the major players.

LISTEN HERE TO DISCUSSION OF RECENT WEATHER EVENTS WITH NATALIE BENNETT

LISTEN HERE TO DISCUSSION OF LOCAL BUDGET WITH LEO LITTMAN

LISTEN HERE TO DISCUSSION WITH AERON DAVIS ON AUSTERITY

LISTEN HERE TO INTERVIEW WITH JOHN WEEKS. .

LISTEN HERE TO LATEST INTERVIEW ON FRACKING .

LISTEN HERE TO INTERVIEW WITH SUE BOWES AND TOM HICKEY ON AUSTERITY

 LISTEN HERE TO INTERVIEW WITH MAX KEISER ON CAUSES OF AUSTERITY

LISTEN HERE TO INTERVIEW WITH JOSE BOVE, REBECCA HARMS AND OTHER AT BALCOMBE ANTI FRACKING DEMO 19−01−14

LISTEN HERE TO POLITICS SHOW ON FUEL POVERTY WITH KAYLA ENTE

LISTEN HERE TO INTERVIEW WITH CAROL DAWES AND KATHRYN MCWHIRTER ON THE CONSEQUENCES OF FRACKING

LISTEN HERE TO DISCUSSION WITH ALI GHANIMI AND IAN CUNNINGHAM ABOUT EDUCATION 

LISTEN HERE FOR DISCUSSION ON RACISM WITH LOUISE PURBRICK AND MATTHEW CARR

LISTEN HERE FOR DISCUSSION ON YOUNG PEOPLE, THEIR ISSUES AND THEIR EFFECT ON SOCIETY WITH MADDY WILLIAMS AND TOM ROBINSON

LISTEN HERE FOR INTERVIEW WITH MADELEINE DICKENS AND ANDY WORTHINGTON ON THE NHS 

 LISTEN HERE FOR DISCUSSION ON THE TRANSPORT ISSUES IN BRIGHTON WITH DUNCAN BLINKHORN

LISTEN HERE FOR DISCUSSION OF CURRENT STATE OF THE BENEFITS SYSTEM WITH IMOGEN FORBES

 

Listen here Benefit Stand up Gig Brighthelm May 17th with Kevin Eldon

Listen here to Jay Law with George McKenzie

In Jay’s own words.….….….…..

My son has recently been dia­gnosed with neur­ofibromatosis, a genetic con­di­tion that, amongst other things, stops the body from being able to inhibit the growth of tumours.

As a res­ult of the the amaz­ing sup­port we have received from The Neuro Found­a­tion, a small char­ity that offers help to those affected byNF, I have decided to organ­ise some events to raise money for them.

May 17th is NF Aware­ness Day so I am put­ting on a stand up com­edy show at the Brighthelm Centre dur­ing the Fringe fest­ival. I have been lucky enough to have a num­ber of comedi­ans offer their time in sup­port of the char­ity includ­ing Kevin Eldon (star of BBC2’s ‘It’s Kevin’, ‘Stew­art Lee’s Com­edy Vehicle’, ‘Alan Part­ridge’ and numer­ous other shows from the last 20 years) 2013 Edin­burgh Best New­comer Award Win­ner John Kearns along with Benny Boot, Ed Aczel, Pete Johans­son and Chris­tian Tal­bot, with more acts to be announced.

I am fund­ing the show myself, and have a fairly lim­ited advert­ising budget so would really appre­ci­ate if you are able to help pro­mote the event in any way at all — I could do with as much help as pos­sible so any sup­port would be amazing!

 

Listen here: Celebrating Gay Marriage in Brighton

LISTEN HERE TO INTERVIEW WITH NADIA BUNKER

Five same-sex couples tied the knot in Brighton on the day the law allow­ing gay mar­riages in Eng­land and Wales came into effect.James Pre­ston and Phil Robathan were the first to be mar­ried at Brighton Town Hall at 08:00 GMT, where Brighton Gay Men’s Chorus was singing.

Phil Robathan, left and James Preston hold hands as a guest reactsPhil Robathan, left, and James Pre­ston were the first to be mar­ried at Brighton Town Hall
The couple released doves fol­low­ing their wed­ding cere­mony. Con­grat­u­la­tions and best wishes for every hap­pi­ness from all of us at Radio Free Brighton.
 

Green MP Caroline Lucas cleared over Fracking Protest

We’ve just heard from the court in Brighton where five Bal­combe anti-fracking protest­ors includ­ing Car­oline Lucas MP are on trial.

And the ver­dict is… NOT GUILTY!

We hope that you’re as happy as we are with this fant­astic news.

But we’re not cel­eb­rat­ing quite yet. As Car­oline Lucas said this after­noon from out­side the court in Brighton:

We are pleased that the court upheld our right to peace­fully protest against frack­ing, but this judge­ment is not a vic­tory. We will con­tinue to cam­paign to end frack­ing and cel­eb­rate when that has been achieved.”

In the light of the UN’s latest report on cli­mate change, it is clearer than ever that the only safe and respons­ible thing to do with shale gas is to leave it in the ground.”

All five of us would like to thank every­one who has turned up to sup­port us and thank the thou­sands of people who have sent let­ters, emails and tweets to express their support.”

You can read Caroline’s full reac­tion to the not-guilty ver­dict here.

BBC — ‘Green MP Car­oline Lucas cleared over Frack­ing Protest’

Huff­ing­ton Post — ‘Lucas found Not Guilty Over Anti-Fracking Protest’

 

Listen Here : Let’s Accelerate With Particles!!

Thank you to the Uni of Sus­sex dept of Phys­ics and astro­nomy for let­ting us share this lec­ture from a pub­lic meet­ing April 10th. LISTEN HERE

 

Listen Here: Big Green Interview Richard Howarth on B&H and Lewes Downs Biosphere Project

LISTEN HERE TO INTERVIEW BY FLEMMICH WEBB WITH RICHARD HOWARTH

Brighton & Hove and Lewes Downs Bio­sphere Part­ner­ship have sub­mit­ted a bid to UNESCO to become the UK’s new­est Bio­sphere Reserve. The bid doc­u­ments are the end product of two years’ work by part­ners. To mark the occa­sion, Chris Todd, chair of the Bio­sphere Part­ner­ship, handed over the bid doc­u­ments to James Bridge, Chief Exec­ut­ive of the UK National Com­mis­sion for UNESCO (UKNC), at an event in Brighton.

It is hoped that becom­ing a Bio­sphere Reserve will drive up envir­on­mental stand­ards by inspir­ing people to get involved with their local envir­on­ment and encour­age pub­lic and private and vol­un­tary bod­ies to work more closely together. This will help improve the qual­ity of life for res­id­ents, while also mak­ing it a more attract­ive place to visit.

Read the bid here.

The pro­posed Bio­sphere Reserve cov­ers the whole area between the River Adur and the River Ouse, includ­ing extend­ing 2 naut­ical miles out to sea. To the north it fol­lows the South Downs National Park boundary. It has almost exactly the same area as the Isle of Wight.

Chris Todd, Chair of the Brighton & Hove and Lewes Downs Bio­sphere Part­ner­ship said:

We’ve brought together a grow­ing wide range of part­ners who have been inspired by the bid. This has already improved net­work­ing within and around the area. A suc­cess­ful out­come can only strengthen this part­ner­ship and will hope­fully inspire more people to get involved with their local environment.”

James Bridge of the UK National Com­mis­sion for UNESCO said:

We’re proud to endorse the Brighton & Hove and Lewes Downs Bio­sphere bid. The bid high­lights the area’s out­stand­ing envir­on­ment.  It is worth adding that our most recent study shows that the UK’s five exist­ing Bio­sphere Reserves gen­er­ate an estim­ated annual fin­an­cial bene­fit to the UK of £2.3 million.”

The UKNC has endorsed the Bio­sphere bid.

A Bio­sphere Reserve is an inter­na­tional site of excel­lence to bring together nature con­ser­va­tion and sus­tain­able devel­op­ment in prac­tice, as a work­ing example of a more bal­anced rela­tion­ship between people and nature. The UK cur­rently has five Bio­sphere Reserves.

Find out more about the bid at www.biospherehere.org.uk.

 

Listen here: Update on situation in Ukraine with Dr Stefanie Ortmann

LISTEN HERE to an update with Dr Stefanie Ort­mann on the cur­rent situ­ation in Ukraine 10−04−14

 

 LISTEN HERE to pre­vi­ous talk on this subject

Dr. Stefanie Ort­mann Lec­turer in Inter­na­tional Rela­tions (Inter­na­tional Rela­tions, School of Global Studies) University of Sus­sex dis­cusses the cur­rent situ­ation in Ukraine, fol­lowed by a Q&A.

 Her geo­graphic area of research is Rus­sia and the former Soviet space (in par­tic­u­lar rela­tions between Rus­sia and Central Asia).
More con­cretely, she is cur­rently pur­su­ing four research projects:
- the evolving iden­tity of the Rus­sian state as “hyper-Westphalian” Great Power and sov­er­eign demo­cracy in the post-Soviet period, and the light this sheds on the concept of iden­tity and state social­iz­a­tion in constructivist IR.
- polit­ical con­spir­acy the­or­ies in the former Soviet space 
- the pos­sib­il­ity of a crit­ical approach to Area Stud­ies and the rela­tion­ship between fieldwork/area research and IR
- A Leverhulme-funded research pro­ject (2010−1013) invest­ig­ates élite net­works between Rus­sia and Cent­ral Asia and their implic­a­tions for post-Soviet state build­ing, the nature of “inter­na­tional polit­ics” in the CIS, and the per­petu­ation of the post-Soviet space.
 

Listen here BHESCO Shows and Update

Listen here to BHESCO 9−4−14

Listen here to BHESCO 14−3−14

Listen here to BHESCO 21−2−14

From BHESCO’s web­site www.bhesco.co.uk

For many years the ‘Big Six’ energy com­pan­ies have been in con­trol of the sup­ply of energy to most of us. At BHESCo. we feel that there is and should be an altern­at­ive to this inequit­able situ­ation. We are a social enter­prise, with the exper­i­ence to estab­lish a com­munity energy sup­plier, bring­ing people together in a col­lect­ive action to take more con­trol of their energy sup­ply. Instead of pay­ing ever increas­ing gas and elec­tri­city bills, BHESCO cus­tom­ers join forces to buy a share in energy pro­jects that we develop. Instead of the profits going to share­hold­ers, we rein­vest our money by mak­ing our cus­tom­ers homes more energy effi­cient through insu­la­tion, bet­ter boil­ers, draught proof­ing etc, and we install renew­able energy micro-generation at our customer’s property.

Brighton & Hove Energy Ser­vices Co-operative Ltd (BHESCo) is a con­sumer co-operative, an indus­trial and provid­ent soci­ety, registered with the Fin­an­cial Con­duct Author­ity.  BHESCo was estab­lished to help con­sumers lower their energy costs now and in the future by intro­du­cin­gen­ergy sav­ings and renew­able energy micro-generation in com­munit­ies, empower­ing indi­vidu­als to take more con­trol over their own energy supply.

 

Listen here: Better World Cameroon: Fostering Regenerative Education & Permaculture Training in Bafut, Cameroon with Joshua Konkankoh

LISTEN HERE

Recor­ded on Tues­day 8th April Uni of Sussex

Joshua  presents a pro­ject that involves com­munit­ies in North West Region of Cameroon and serves as a Demon­stra­tion site for Per­ma­cul­ture Train­ing for Cent­ral Africa.  The Ndan­i­for Per­ma­cul­ture Eco vil­lage has been work­ing to cre­ate an alli­ance of youth net­works in Cameroon and the cent­ral African region.  Since 1996 when Bet­ter World Cameroon was registered, its eco­lo­gical agri­cul­ture divi­sion has been work­ing to pro­mote respons­ible farm­ing prac­tices through Envir­on­mental Edu­ca­tion in schools, Devel­op­ment  Edu­ca­tion Resource Centres, Nature Parks, school gar­dens and IT resources as learn­ing tools. This par­tic­u­lar pro­ject aims to pro­mote and imple­ment eth­ic­ally & cul­tur­ally sus­tain­able devel­op­ment through coöper­a­tion; apply innov­at­ive Eco Vil­lage Edu­ca­tion and Per­ma­cul­ture Design; develop tech­niques to empower youth entre­pren­eur­ship and community/Eco tour­ism; estab­lish an IT and e-learning plat­form as social incub­ator to improve shar­ing, learn­ing and global cit­izen­ship.  Joshua is inter­est­ing in dis­cuss­ing what links might be developed with the Uni­ver­sity of Brighton

More info on the pro­ject can be found at: www.betterworld-cameroon.com andhttp://youtu.be/XNMXqtc2brs.

 

 

Community Energy takes on Fracking as 15 community energy schemes launch across Sussex

Bal­combe hit the head­lines again this week: not because of the Sauron-like threat of evil Cuad­rilla, but because plucky loc­als in the vil­lage have star­ted their own com­munity energy scheme:REPOWERBal­combe.

Indeed, REPOWERBal­combe is one of 15 energy coops launched recently across Sus­sex. Under the ment­or­ing of Com­munity Energy South, these com­munity groups are now being up-skilled by the team at OVESCO in Lewes, ready for launches in the next 12 months or so.

It’s surely supremely ironic that the threat of frack­ing in East and West Sus­sex — where thou­sands of wells are required to ful­fill frack com­pan­ies’ prom­ises to share­hold­ers — is caus­ing a surge in interest in its alternative.

And while the anti-fracking move­ment grows in strength, com­munity energy also grows as a pos­it­ive altern­at­ive. Being involved in both camps, it’s inter­est­ing to see how anti-fracking is seed­ing this potential:

  • Res­ist­ance to frack­ing has boos­ted com­munity spirit in areas affected. It’s an old maxim that people tend to unite in the face of a threat; in the towns and vil­lage where frack­ers are intent on drilling, anti-fracking groups are some of the largest (and most act­ive) organ­isa­tions in each place. This provides fer­tile ground for sim­il­arly aligned groups, such as those sup­port­ing renew­able energy.
  • Anti-fracking requires an atten­tion to detail that that — for many of us — would simply be too dull to con­tem­plate a few years back. Com­pre­hend­ing the miasma of tech­nical, reg­u­lat­ory, legal, and fin­an­cial mech­an­isms involved in the oil and gas industry have all been fun­da­mental to the fight against frack­ing — and block­ing frack­ers uses much of this type of this industry-specific know­ledge. The devil really is in the detail.
  • These finely — honed skills are trans­fer­able onto some­thing more pos­it­ive. Com­munity energy schemes require learn­ing about organ­isa­tional struc­tures (usu­ally Coops), work­ing out how to raise money, deal­ing with lease agree­ments as well as the tech­nical bits and pieces to do with gen­er­a­tion equip­ment and grid con­nec­tion. This kind of atten­tion to detail reaps rewards when applied to this new form of renew­able energy development.
  • The new res­ist­ance to government-led pro­gramme of uncon­ven­tional fossil fuels has revealed people power as an effect­ive weapon. And grass­roots action cuts both ways: it can res­ist, but it can also grow. A bot­tom up move­ment is rising: with mod­els such as OVESCO in Lewes and Brighton Energy Coop, com­munit­ies around Sus­sex (and bey­ond) can see that their their long-held frus­tra­tions over the lack of renew­able energy might be sor­ted out via DIY. If you want some­thing doing, you gotta do it yourself.

In Ger­many, nearly 50% of renew­able energy is owned by indi­vidu­als and com­munity groups. More than 1000 coops help power the nations renew­able energy trans­ition. Many fossil fuel power sta­tions have been shut down; renew­able energy has simply out-competed them. For the UK’s oil and gas industry, this is a wor­ry­ing trend: have their frack­ing activ­it­ies kicked over a hor­nets nest that threatens them with their own extinction?

By Will Cottrell

For more inform­a­tion please go to:

http://www.brightonenergy.org.uk/author/will/

 

Listen here: Young people from Prince’s Trust discuss Unemployment

LISTEN HERE : Tom and Tristan inter­view Rebecca Adams, Rob­bie Bry­ant and Ben Glazebrook about the prob­lem of unem­ploy­ment in Bri­tain, espe­cially for young people.

 

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